Ayoade on Ayoade by Richard Ayoade

Ayoade on Ayoade: A Cinematic Odyssey by Richard Ayoade

About This Book

In this book Richard Ayoade — actor, writer, director, and amateur dentist — reflects on his cinematic legacy as only he can: in conversation with himself. Over ten brilliantly insightful and often erotic interviews, Ayoade examines Ayoade fully and without mercy, leading a breathless investigation into this once-in-a-generation visionary.

Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Galdwell

Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell

About This Book

Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland—throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don’t know. And because we don’t know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world.

A Well-Read Woman by Kate Stewart

A Well-Read Woman by Kate Stewart

About This Book

Librarians, the stereotype would have it, are quiet and unassuming. Not so Ruth Rappaport. This remarkable woman found her calling in librarianship only after a life that included her fleeing Nazi Germany at 15 to live with a series of relatives in the U.S., losing both her parents to the Holocaust, working in the Zionist movement, and trying out a number of occupations here and abroad. Rappaport started her library career in Vietnam, expanding a system of libraries to serve the U.S. military personnel stationed there during the war, and she eventually worked at the Library of Congress, where she cataloged books in the social sciences for 20 years. Stewart, currently an archivist at the Arizona Historical Society, has combed through letters, diaries, personal papers, and other resources to create a wonderful, nuanced portrait of a singular woman whose life, though fraught with personal trauma, persecution, and political unrest, was grounded in an abiding love for books and reading and the solace they bring. An inspiring story told with genuine affection and respect.–Carolyn Mulac Booklist

More Than Enough

More Than Enough by Elaine Welteroth

About This Book

“In this part-manifesto, part-memoir, the revolutionary editor who infused social consciousness into the pages of Teen Vogue explores what it means to come into your own–on your own terms Throughout her life, Elaine Welteroth has climbed the ranks of media and fashion, shattering ceilings along the way. In this riveting and timely memoir, the groundbreaking journalist unpacks lessons on race, identity, and success through her own journey, from navigating her way as the unstoppable child of a unlikely interracial marriage in small-town California to finding herself on the frontlines of a modern movement for the next generation of change makers. Welteroth moves beyond the headlines and highlight reels to share the profound lessons and struggles of being abarrier-breaker across so many intersections. As a young boss and the only black woman in the room, she’s had enough of the world telling her–and all women–they’re not enough. As she learns to rely on herself by looking both inward and upward, we’re ultimately reminded that we’re more than enough”

What Doesn't Kill You Makes You Blacker

What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker by Damon Young

About This Book

For Damon Young, existing while Black is an extreme sport. The act of possessing black skin while searching for space to breathe in America is enough to induce a ceaseless state of angst where questions such as “How should I react here, as a professional black person?” and “Will this white person’s potato salad kill me?” are forever relevant. What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker chronicles Young’s efforts to survive while battling and making sense of the various neuroses his country has given him. It’s a condition that’s sometimes stretched to absurd limits, provoking the angst that made him question if he was any good at the “being straight” thing, as if his sexual orientation was something he could practice and get better at, like a crossover dribble move or knitting; creating the farce where, as a teen, he wished for a white person to call him a racial slur just so he could fight him and have a great story about it; and generating the surreality of watching gentrification transform his Pittsburgh neighborhood from predominantly Black to “Portlandia . . . but with Pierogies.” And, at its most devastating, it provides him reason to believe that his mother would be alive today if she were white. From one of our most respected cultural observers, What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Blacker is a hilarious and honest debut that is both a celebration of the idiosyncrasies and distinctions of Blackness and a critique of white supremacy and how we define masculinity.